Definition of age in English:

age

verb

[no object]
  • 1Grow old or older.

    ‘the tiredness we feel as we age’
    • ‘Ng said Hong Kong's population was ageing and the government's medical expenditure would continue to grow.’
    • ‘Shanghai has seen its population ageing for the past two decades, with senior residents now accounting for over 18 per cent of its population.’
    • ‘I've been looking at some pictures of when I first came and I've aged an awful lot.’
    • ‘Paramilitary bosses were ageing and their members grown rich on cross-border smuggling, robbery and money laundering.’
    • ‘I think they've aged in a lot of ways, but I don't think their essential character has changed.’
    • ‘As their home countries' economies grow and populations age, these flows are likely to get smaller.’
    • ‘As Florida's answer to punk rock closes in on a decade of making music, their fan base may be growing, but it doesn't seem to be aging.’
    • ‘He has teamed with Paul Simon, one of the few rock - era songwriters to mature as he aged, for a double blast of complex musicianship and high harmony.’
    • ‘You have Baby Boomers aging, a lot of them tremendous health care bills.’
    • ‘As he aged, Kantanos had grown more accustomed to his way of life, had accepted it.’
    • ‘We are all going to age, but why allow ourselves to age faster than need be?’
    • ‘She wondered what he would look like if he had been allowed to age to twenty-five years.’
    • ‘The couple claimed that because the tiles had aged they would no longer match and the whole lot should be replaced.’
    • ‘Her cat is slowly aging and requires a lot of care.’
    • ‘If one is fortunate enough to be associated with a university, even as one ages, teaching allows one to contribute to, and vicariously share, in the creativity of youth.’
    • ‘Events happen day to day, as the episodes are broadcast, and unwind slowly with the years, so that characters grow and age in real time.’
    • ‘As my mother aged she grew more and more scattered and frustrating in a number of ways.’
    • ‘Now, Paterson is slight, but he is fast, he is willing, he is clever, and he is only going to get better and better as his rugby career, and his waist and chest and thighs, grow as he ages and matures.’
    • ‘He aged and became senile, but no batter how shrunken his body became, he remained alive.’
    • ‘Although we cannot stop aging, we can certainly stop growing old.’
    • ‘What happens as she ages and her voice grows out of the girlishness it can't get away from, deepens into a woman's voice expressing a woman's soul.’
    • ‘And you will age in the same neighbourhoods; and you will grow grey in these same houses.’
    • ‘Populations are aging and the need for an augmented labour force is growing.’
    • ‘A lot of the content hasn't aged especially well in the past few decades, and much of the humor is still aimed at 10-year-olds.’
    • ‘The objective was meant to prepare senior citizens to age gracefully and live a meaningful life.’
    • ‘Access to advanced medical devices is key to ensuring that the nation's healthcare system keeps pace with a population that is growing and aging.’
    1. 1.1with object Cause to appear old or older.
      ‘he even tried ageing the painting with a spoonful of coffee’
      • ‘She's a young woman and I didn't want to get her something that would age her, so I went with the single pearl.’
      • ‘Mrs. G. said that it was the sudden losses, not the passing years, that had aged her unexpectedly.’
      • ‘And, having become a specialist in prosthetics, he was responsible for ageing Damian Lewis in the recent re-make of The Forsyte Saga.’
      • ‘I wished that I had aged the paper first by soaking in tea, as I usually do.’
      • ‘It was plenty warm outside, but the shawl would age her appearance even more.’
      • ‘I'm not a feudal vassal, thank God, as all that toiling in the fields ages one horribly.’
      • ‘Dark lipstick ages you, it's true, but when you are 20 you want to look older than your age.’
      • ‘“Movie magic” had aged the paint and metal to make it look antique.’
      • ‘As for domesticity, it ages one rapidly, and distracts one's mind from higher things.’
    2. 1.2 (with reference to an alcoholic drink, cheese, etc.) mature or allow to mature.
      no object ‘the wine ages in open vats or casks’
      with object ‘a cheese that has been aged for four months’
      • ‘The merchants then aged the wine, bottled and sold it around the world often featuring the merchant's name prominently.’
      • ‘The big question, therefore, particularly given the lack of acidity, is whether these wines will age well.’
      • ‘For if you allow these beauties to age, even if only for a minute, they will lose their sharpness, their appeal and their zest.’
      • ‘The wine will age, our anger with France will pass, and we'll buy that Burgundy in a few years.’
      • ‘Time flew, and before long, those good-value wines aged and became almost too good to drink - was there ever an occasion important enough?’
      • ‘For three years the wine is aged in new barrels made of hand-split oak staves.’
      • ‘Firstly, for a €13 bottle, this was compelling wine that aged and evolved very interestingly over four or five years.’
      • ‘We bought six bottles then and they have been aging nicely and drinking excellently now.’
      • ‘The wine is aged for 3 years, with at least two years in oak barrels before release.’
      • ‘Cheeses age at different rates and must be held at constant temperatures to achieve their optimum flavour.’
      • ‘It's best to have one that's made with the same material that your wine is aged in.’
      • ‘Of course, now comes the hard part, the one in which you have to wait and let the jars rest, allowing them to age on a shelf in the cool cellar.’
      • ‘Quality Vouvray, either dry or sweet, demands to be aged.’
      • ‘If good wines need time to age properly, the same could said of speeches.’
      • ‘And raw-milk cheeses aged more than 60 days are not risk-free either.’
      • ‘While this may sound rather unpleasant, it is the tannin which provides the structure of red wines and allows them to age and mature.’
      • ‘Madeira is the only wine in the world where heat is deliberately applied to age the wine artificially.’
      • ‘The culturing process continues as the mild cheddar is allowed to age for about two months.’
      • ‘The taste is unique with a charcoal mellowed flavour that contains influences from the barrel it was aged in with hints of caramel, vanilla, and oak.’
      • ‘Spirit labelled ‘brandy’ must be distilled from wine made from the fermentation of grapes and by law has to be aged for a minimum of three years in oak barrels.’
      mature, ripen, mellow, become mellow, make mellow, season, condition, soften, sweeten, grow up, come of age
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3with object Determine how old (something) is.
      ‘we didn't have a clue how to age these animals’
      • ‘The fish are aged by identifying and counting the number of annulus found on a fish scale.’
      • ‘Cubs were aged when they were first seen, when their age could be estimated to within an accuracy of 1 month.’
      • ‘Timed embryos were aged more specifically by morphology.’
      • ‘All captured birds were aged (young of the year or adult), sexed, and marked.’
      • ‘Birds were aged according to a regression equation for age on the length of the wing for storks.’

Pronunciation

age

/eɪdʒ/