Definition of Wednesday in English:

Wednesday

noun

  • The day of the week before Thursday and following Tuesday.

    ‘a report goes before the councillors on Wednesday’
    ‘the first Wednesday of each month’
    ‘they finish early on Wednesdays’
    as modifier ‘on a Wednesday morning’
    • ‘Carl arrived home early on Wednesday morning for a tearful reunion with Kim on the doorstep.’
    • ‘Last Wednesday he saw a specialist and we didn't think he'd be fit in time for the Brighton game.’
    • ‘I attended lectures on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and there were tutorials in the morning.’
    • ‘The minster was at the school on Wednesday to officially open its new dance and drama studios.’
    • ‘The performances took place on Tuesday afternoon last week and on Wednesday evening.’
    • ‘She was born on Wednesday, March 29, 1922 in Oakdale and she is a famous politician from the United States.’
    • ‘The library is open to the public every day except Mondays with late opening hours on Wednesdays and Thursdays until 7pm.’
    • ‘Next Wednesday morning, the sky is going to be extremely overcast for a few minutes.’
    • ‘On Wednesday evening last week that seemed like only the remotest of possibilities.’
    • ‘It was odd; the only days she didn't go to work were Thursdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays.’
    • ‘When I went there they said they only did trips on a Tuesday and a Wednesday.’
    • ‘He said the clean-up would be completed by Wednesday as most of the work had already been done in the past week.’
    • ‘Bonfire Night is a week on Wednesday - I'm looking forward to sparklers and toffee.’
    • ‘Parents began to take Wednesdays off to spend more time with their children (French schools close on Wednesday afternoons).’
    • ‘Early on a Wednesday morning two of us go to where the paper is dropped off in Camden and then take it to other sellers.’
    • ‘I had a job interview last Wednesday, but unfortunately didn't get the job.’
    • ‘From this week civil cases will be heard on a Tuesday with criminal cases heard fortnightly on Wednesdays and Thursdays.’
    • ‘Talks between union leaders and employers will take place on Wednesday and Thursday.’
    • ‘The least expensive days to fly are typically Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.’
    • ‘Michelle and I go out on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays; I avoid the weekends like the plague.’
    • ‘He then returned to steal from the property on the Tuesday and Wednesday of the following week.’
    • ‘If shopping is your thing there is a lively outdoor market every Thursday and Saturday, as well as the indoor market every day except Wednesdays and Sundays.’
    • ‘Janet and Eve are coming over on Tuesday, staying the night and returning home on Wednesday.’

The days of the week in ancient Rome were named after the planets, which in turn were named after gods. In most cases the Germanic names substituted the name of a comparable Germanic god for the Roman god's name

adverb

North American
  • 1On Wednesday.

    ‘see you Wednesday’
    • ‘When my team arrived Wednesday we had to fight with everyone to get a boat in the water.’
    • ‘Were you there Wednesday?’
    1. 1.1Wednesdays On Wednesdays; each Wednesday.
      ‘Wednesdays, the jazz DJ hosts a jam session’
      • ‘The Leisure League will play Wednesdays from 6:00-7:30 p.m., June 18-July 23, at the high school.’
      • ‘I am there Wednesdays and Fridays.’
      • ‘We play Wednesdays and Sundays at 7:00pm.’

The days of the week in ancient Rome were named after the planets, which in turn were named after gods. In most cases the Germanic names substituted the name of a comparable Germanic god for the Roman god's name

Origin

Old English Wōdnesdæg ‘day of Odin’, named after the Germanic god Odin or Woden, the supreme god; translation of late Latin Mercurii dies, Odin being equated with the Roman god Mercury. Compare with Dutch woensdag.

Pronunciation

Wednesday

/ˈwɛnzdeɪ//ˈwɛnzdi/