Definition of October in English:

October

noun

  • The tenth month of the year, in the northern hemisphere usually considered the second month of autumn.

    ‘the project started in October’
    ‘one of the wettest Octobers on record’
    • ‘By October the Americans had heard of the project and asked for the details and an engine.’
    • ‘By October she was back to the No.1 spot in the rankings and her career was back on track.’
    • ‘It was a cold October night and the wind was howling and it had started to spit with rain.’
    • ‘They've completely lost my December, shifted my November and given me two Octobers instead.’
    • ‘In October 2002 Evans pounced on the youngster as he went to the shops to buy a pint of milk.’
    • ‘Fresh or canned, they can help keep you healthy for many Octobers to come.’
    • ‘During the last two Octobers we had seven flight Class A mishaps and killed eight Airmen in ground accidents.’
    • ‘Some Octobers have been particularly rough sledding for the stock market.’
    • ‘A decision on the hospital is due to be taken by the trust at its October meeting.’
    • ‘But I do wonder what happened to the kids I met a few Octobers ago.’
    • ‘Two of his first four wins came against the Yankees, the team that knocked the Mariners out of the playoffs in each of the past two Octobers.’
    • ‘Last October the company decided they wanted to close the scheme to new entrants.’
    • ‘City have failed to win in three games since Todd was named October manager of the month.’
    • ‘In October a reader asked if I could think of a way of earning some money at home.’
    • ‘Mild Septembers, kind Octobers - they build up this strange meteorological goodwill that seeks you through the bleakest February.’
    • ‘It turned out to be the only ring Bouton won, because New York fell to the Dodgers and Cardinals, respectively, the next two Octobers.’
    • ‘The centre would open from April to October each year and by appointment at other times.’
    • ‘By October the next year all salvage was abandoned and she became a total loss.’
    • ‘In October a general amnesty was declared for all who had taken up arms against the Republic.’
    • ‘To that end the council will hold a ballot of tenants in September or October this year.’

Origin

Late Old English, from Latin, from octo ‘eight’ (being originally the eighth month of the Roman year).

Pronunciation

October

/ɒkˈtəʊbə/