Definition of Mistress of the Robes in English:

Mistress of the Robes

noun

  • (in the English royal household) a woman of high rank in charge of the Queen's wardrobe.

    • ‘The position has its origins in the reign of Elizabeth I, when the Mistress of the Robes had charge of a queen's jewellery and clothes, especially her Robes of State.’
    • ‘After Anne became queen she named Sarah to other prominent posts including Keeper of the Privy Purse, Mistress of the Robes and Groom of the Stole.’
    • ‘The first Mistress of the Robes was appointed in 1906 with the roles of Gentlemen in Waiting and Standard Bearers being added in 1908, that of Mace Bearer in 1909 and then Britannia in 1913.’
    • ‘Historical relics include Monmouth's saddle and execution shirt, Sir Walter Scott's plaid and some proof editions, Queen Victoria's letters and gifts to successive Duchesses of Buccleuch, her Mistresses of the Robes.’
    • ‘The sitter - as Groom of the Stole and Mistress of the Robes - was in charge of the ladies of the bedchamber and the maids of honour.’
    • ‘The Mistress of the Robes and a distinguished general were among the early suspects.’
    • ‘Sorry for asking again, but was there any equivalent to the Mistress of the Robes in the Spanish court?’
    • ‘The Mistress of the Robes maintains social contacts on behalf of the Queen, for instance with heads of diplomatic missions and members of the International Court of Justice.’
    • ‘Sarah did indeed reign at court as Groom of the Stole, Mistress of the Robes, Keeper of the Privy Purse.’
    • ‘Both were good friends of Queen Victoria and members of her court; the Duchess being Mistress of the Robes.’
    • ‘They were the Mistress of the Robes, two Ladies of the Bedchamber and four Women of the Bedchamber.’
    • ‘Anne, the first Countess was Mistress of the Robes to Queen Victoria and later married the Duke of Sutherland.’
    • ‘My mother-in-law, Mary Devonshire, who was Mistress of the Robes to The Queen from 1953 till 1967, used to fetch the jewels from the bank stowed in a Marks & Spencer carrier bag.’