• (in the UK) Ministry of Defence.

Main definitions of mod in English

: mod1mod2mod3mod4Mod5MOD6

mod1

adjective

informal
  • Modern.

    ‘boldly mix mod with trad for eye-catching results’
    • ‘These two have a groovy townhouse with lots of mod furnishings.’
    • ‘Everything screams Euro, from the glossy wine-red walls dressed with oversized posters to the throbbing house to the floor-to-ceiling stall doors and mod capsule hand dryer in the WC.’
    • ‘Families who have every hi-tech mod con in their rooms, overnight laundry service and on-tap pampering for mums and dads.’
    • ‘A secret chamber with all mod surveillance and survival cons, it is all the rage in New York.’
    in fashion, in vogue, voguish, popular, up to date, bang up to date, up to the minute, modern, all the rage, modish, trendsetting
    View synonyms

noun

British
  • (especially in the early 1960s) a young person of a subculture characterized by a smart stylish appearance, the riding of motor scooters, and a liking for soul music.

    • ‘This brand new quartet has a sweet spin on '60s pop that any self-respecting Britpop and mod fanatic should check out.’
    • ‘He didn't have a scooter, but he bought a mod parka and - as was de rigueur at the time - sewed a fox's tail onto it.’
    • ‘Even the new dress codes and hairstyles of rockers, mods, or hippies became suspect.’
    • ‘After all, parents in earlier times were once scandalised by teddy boys and mods and hippies and punks.’
    • ‘By the late 60s many working-class mods had evolved into skinheads, and were listening to the music coming out of Jamaica at the time.’
    • ‘The clubs I have been involved in here are either funk or mod clubs.’
    • ‘Gold's milieu, the laid-back '70s, saw things move away from the highly tailored mod look to unisex dressing inspired by the sexual revolution and feminism.’
    • ‘Sharp shooting 70s and mod era riffs were pelted out to introduce the raw indie/garage punk sounds.’
    • ‘It was an era when official news bulletins were worrying themselves about mods and rockers, or the hallucinogenic drugs of the hippies.’
    • ‘The guitar and bass gave the sound real mod attitude, while the backing vocals added as much soul as the keyboards offered depth and quality to the experience.’
    • ‘Weekenders trace their roots to the mods and rockers' bank holiday rave-ups on the south coast in the Sixties.’
    • ‘Back in the Eighties, you were either a mod, a long-haired rocker or a football casual and if you were a particularly awkward teenager you were a goth.’
    • ‘They are keeping this same spirit alive today, as have so many other garage, punk and mod bands for the past 40 years.’
    • ‘No other clique can hold a candle to the mod fashionistas.’
    • ‘I think a lot of mod music is cool, but I prefer to be black belt’
    • ‘In the 1960s, he'd been the resident DJ at London's hippest mod club, The Scene.’
    • ‘His dapper mod dress code contradicts the sweaty confrontationalism he projects on stage (and just off - any open dancefloor space is by rights his as well).’
    • ‘Definite '60s mod influence but nothing to intense and no retro feel.’
    • ‘Before there were mods and before flower power or hippies, there were beatniks.’
    • ‘Men expect to see the return of the pointy-toe brogues with a thick leather sole, as well as the Chelsea boot to polish your mod style.’

Origin

Abbreviation of modern or modernist.

Pronunciation

mod

/mɒd/

Main definitions of mod in English

: mod1mod2mod3mod4Mod5MOD6

mod2

noun

usually mods
informal
  • A modification.

    • ‘The design will need to incorporate all the same blogger tags, links and sidebar elements as the current template with scope for easy mods.’
    • ‘The mod in question allows players to zoom right in to the action and allows for a much more free experience.’
    • ‘Another popular mod, for cases that lack it, is attaching USB connections to the front of the case.’

Main definitions of mod in English

: mod1mod2mod3mod4Mod5MOD6

mod3

preposition

Mathematics

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Make modifications to; modify.

    ‘both the single-player and multiplayer games can be modded’
    • ‘The comments we got from sixteen year olds who were illegally modding their wetware at the time were priceless.’
    • ‘I had thought about modding my PSU to make it modular, but never got around to actually doing it.’
    • ‘It'll be like modding a car: You buy the really basic model, and swap out the things you don't like for things you do like.’
    • ‘Apple computers have been modded into PCs and vice versa.’
    • ‘Needless to say, if I do start modding it, my first stop will be here.’
    • ‘There are many other reasons people want to mod their consoles.’
    • ‘A good article in the Tech Review looks at the issue of mod chips, and how far companies go to stop anyone from modding their hardware.’

Pronunciation

mod

/mɒd/

Main definitions of mod in English

: mod1mod2mod3mod4Mod5MOD6

mod4

noun

informal
  • A person who moderates an online forum or discussion; a moderator.

    ‘the post was quickly removed by mods’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • (of the moderator of an online forum or discussion) delete (inappropriate or offensive content)

    ‘my post was modded and prevented from being posted’

Pronunciation

mod

/mɒd/

Main definitions of mod in English

: mod1mod2mod3mod4Mod5MOD6

Mod5

noun

  • A Highland meeting for Gaelic literary and musical competitions.

    • ‘Gaelic-speaking children come to the Mod every year because they are taught to value their culture.’
    • ‘An Comunn Gaidhealach, the organiser of the Mod, is celebrating a major new sponsorship award.’
    • ‘It was MacLeod who came out with the view, which was extremely bold at the time, that a devout Highland Calvinist could have a place for the Mod and the culture.’
    • ‘There should be more opportunities for musicians to use the Mod to launch new albums and make their names.’
    • ‘It was nice that she came, but the question is whether the Mod should have been in this position in the first place.’
    • ‘They fund the Mod and the National Gaelic Arts Project, they prepared a Gaelic language policy ahead of most other organisations.’
    • ‘Once you venture out of the hall where the competitions are taking place you would barely know that the Mod existed.’
    • ‘As a town, Oban has always been at the forefront of things Highland: it is the town after all which hosted the first Gaelic Mod.’
    • ‘The Mod - the biggest Gaelic arts festival - will attract 1,500 competitors in all and many more spectators.’
    • ‘Still, as there are hardly any Gaelic speakers, even at the Mod, no one seemed to notice.’
    • ‘It is also exciting that it's come to the east coast for the first time, following the Mod.’

Origin

From Scottish Gaelic mōd.

Pronunciation

Mod

/mɒd/