Definition of Johannine in English:

Johannine

adjective

  • Relating to the Apostle St John the Evangelist, or to the Gospel or Epistles of John in the New Testament.

    • ‘Finally, we must consider briefly the relationship of John's gospel to the three Johannine letters and the book of Revelation.’
    • ‘In Johannine terms, this group can be called ‘household,’ ‘kingdom’ = household, or the place where one ‘worships in spirit and truth.’’
    • ‘Bartlett's Good Friday sermon on a Johannine text demonstrates well how preaching may be shaped by a particular understanding of the good news.’
    • ‘We have authentic Johannine dualisms here which separate two different worlds, two kinds of people, and insiders from outsiders.’
    • ‘He looks at the Gospel's theology, language, and relationship of narratives to Jesus' discourses and explores the unique Johannine Passion story.’
    • ‘Thus knowing ‘whence’ and ‘whither’ serves to control authentic or elite membership in the Johannine circle by defining that as group sacred space.’
    • ‘This is fair enough, for what survives to us in the Fourth Gospel is the Johannine take on this event.’
    • ‘Like the Pastorals, the Johannine epistles are concerned with questions about valid teaching and right conduct: Christian orthodoxy and orthopraxy.’
    • ‘When the text has Jesus speak of an hour which ‘is coming, and now is’, transcendent, true worship is placed in the context of Johannine eschatology.’
    • ‘Diversity in background notwithstanding, they all choose to identify with the disfranchised characters and ‘unorthodox’ views in the Johannine narrative.’
    • ‘Correctly, I believe, Chilton sees the Johannine presentation as the flowering of the Hellenistic development of the Eucharist.’
    • ‘Investigation of Johannine territoriality next leads us to a native classification of space which is communicated by Jesus himself.’
    • ‘In part 3 John Ashton argues that the Johannine motif of ‘the way’ originates in Jewish wisdom tradition.’
    • ‘Whereas Augustine focuses on the trinitarian nature of God, Denys picks up the Johannine interest in the divine attributes.’
    • ‘Those interested in constructions of the Johannine community and literary approaches to the Gospel will benefit from reading her work.’
    • ‘There probably are countless ways for contemporary American Christians to appropriate Johannine theology of the Paraclete.’
    • ‘The Johannine incarnation Christology rests on this new insight.’
    • ‘‘In private,’ then is classified for the Johannine group as un-holy, un-virtuous space.’
    • ‘The woman's response in verses 11 and 12 is replete with Johannine double-entendre, irony and misunderstanding.’
    • ‘Lastly was the Johannine supplement to the Synoptic accounts, written toward the end of the first century.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from the medieval Latin given name Johannes John + -ine.

Pronunciation:

Johannine

/dʒəʊˈhanʌɪn/