Definition of Jaffa cake in English:

Jaffa cake

noun

British
  • A sponge biscuit with an orange-flavoured jelly and chocolate topping.

    • ‘George Osborne cracks open a packet of Jaffa cakes to celebrate the Conservative Party's best showing in the polls for 14 years.’
    • ‘I want to order Jaffa cakes, loo roll, bottle of milk, and a bar of soap.’
    • ‘My son has proved he can eat a multipack of Jaffa cakes leaving Dad upset because there were none left for him.’
    • ‘They haven't forgiven you for not eating their Jaffa cakes.’
    • ‘Can you get a Jaffa cake out of the pack without damaging the packet?’
    • ‘Pop music, celebrity magazines and Jaffa cakes are pretty low on my list of favourite things.’
    • ‘One of them was a rather harassed young woman who was desperately trying to appease her toddler with a Jaffa cake as she paid for her three bags of shopping.’
    • ‘She enjoyed the snacks though, particularly the Jaffa cakes.’
    • ‘If you have to eat a biscuit you could snack on the England teams biscuit of choice Jaffa cakes.’
    • ‘One of my sisters has even brought along some Jaffa cakes.’
    • ‘Burglars helped themselves to a variety of items from Vickie's home including a vacuum cleaner, DVDs and four packets of Jaffa cakes.’
    • ‘Luckily Omco came to the rescue today, so I am now fully stocked up on Jaffa cakes again.’
    • ‘They talked over a cup of tea and a Jaffa cake in her flat near Billingham.’
    • ‘There are five Jaffa cakes left from first packet bought yesterday.’
    • ‘Portions of Jaffa cakes, bananas and wine gums were prepared for them to eat.’
    • ‘"We decided in the end that the Jaffa cake is iconic in its way," said Angus Stevenson, editor of the two-volume book.’
    • ‘Every day he eats a packet of Jaffa cakes and wholemeal biscuits.’
    • ‘I bought some Jaffa cakes the other day.’
    • ‘Instead I ate half a packet of Jaffa cakes and went to sleep for an hour.’
    • ‘All they give you for free are those thin, flimsy ones that only have enough room inside for one box of Jaffa cakes and a packet of fags.’

Pronunciation:

Jaffa cake

/ˈdʒafəkeɪk/