Definition of International Baccalaureate in English:

International Baccalaureate

(also IB)

noun

trademark
  • A set of examinations intended to qualify successful candidates for higher education in any of several countries.

    • ‘We have another program called the International Baccalaureate, abbreviated as IB.’
    • ‘Students from Swindon can now sign up for the International Baccalaureate.’
    • ‘In the Senior School, for students aged 16 and 17, Dulwich College China offers the International Baccalaureate.’
    • ‘Instead they will take the International Baccalaureate, which involves six subjects, including English, science and a modern language.’
    • ‘Students study the International Baccalaureate, which the school took up 27 years ago, meaning they must take all the core subjects, a modern language and at least two other subjects until they leave.’
    • ‘He holds an International Baccalaureate from the United World College of the Atlantic in Wales as well as an Honours Degree from the University of Cape Town.’
    • ‘Because we have that critical mass we have the potential to offer a range of subjects and perhaps the International Baccalaureate.’
    • ‘The Government was also worried if they didn't provide an A-level system that would stretch candidates, more would jump ship to go to the International Baccalaureate.’
    • ‘That is only true of schools where affluent parents can afford to have their children take Cambridge exams or International Baccalaureate.’
    • ‘The International Baccalaureate, which requires candidates to study a wider range of subjects than under the A-level system, is currently offered by 45 schools and colleges in England.’
    • ‘A growing number of international schools follow the International Baccalaureate which is accepted as an entrance for university around the world.’
    • ‘Educational foundation based in Geneva, Switzerland which offers International Baccalaureates to schools in 112 countries including some school and colleges in the UK.’
    • ‘The schools have decided to enter pupils for the International Baccalaureate, a Swiss-run qualification seen by many as more broadly based and challenging than British exams.’
    • ‘The best-known diploma system is the International Baccalaureate.’
    • ‘Whatever your gripes about the current GCSE or A-level, or alternative qualifications such as the International Baccalaureate, the problems with these modes of assessment only reflect the current crisis in secondary education.’
    • ‘The International Baccalaureate, with its benefits, for instance, is one of those programmes that parents are turning to and asking their children to take on, more and more, in schools.’
    • ‘However, we are thinking of moving him to a school that offers the International Baccalaureate.’
    • ‘No number of independent inquiries, International Baccalaureates or education secretaries' heads will remedy the situation - although no doubt all of these things will be tried.’
    • ‘The International Baccalaureate itself sounds reasonably exciting and challenging.’
    • ‘Is it possible to take the International Baccalaureate exams in maths and French in this country?’

Pronunciation:

International Baccalaureate

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