Main definitions of hag in English

: hag1hag2

hag1

noun

  • 1A witch.

    • ‘One of the stories featured a mad old hag who lived in a cave in the North of England several hundred years ago.’
    • ‘That old hag will haunt me for the rest of my existence.’
    • ‘His second ordeal is to be turned into an old hag, disguised in the clothes of an old aunt reputed to be a witch in order to escape from Mr F again.’
    • ‘He was getting impatient and though she'd done almost everything to have every man despise her, she knew there were certain others who wouldn't care if she were a hag or a witch just to get her inheritance.’
    • ‘I am a magician, not some raggedy old hag who lives for dark magic!’
    • ‘Resonant of medieval folk tales, it conjures up the image of a wizened old hag casting spells on innocent children lost in a tangle of forests.’
    • ‘As children we are told stories about the ugly old Witch hag that would bake children into gingerbread.’
    • ‘She finally lost her temper and turned into this thin old hag wearing a black dress.’
    • ‘I refuse to just lie around and do nothing like a decrepit old hag!’
    • ‘While some sleep-loss victims state that the Old Hag actually appeared to them as a demon-faced woman with long gray hair other descriptions of the same experience vary.’
    • ‘This is a place where witches aren't green hags, flying broomsticks, and scaring children away.’
    • ‘Accompanying them was an old hag with a witches hat and long stringy green, white and gold hair.’
    • ‘Today, the typical witch is generally portrayed as an old hag in a black robe, wearing a pointed black cap and flying on a broomstick across a full moon.’
    • ‘I mean, doesn't everyone think Witches are mythical old hags who ride broomsticks and turn princes into frogs?’
    • ‘One being that he fell in love with a mere human who so happened to be a maid for that old hag.’
    • ‘We are little-known and therefore little-understood, and this is exacerbated by Pagans who insist on aligning us with mythical broomstick-flying wart-sporting hags.’
    • ‘I must admit, I was expecting an ugly old hag with a diseased or pale face… so what I saw startled me.’
    • ‘You can see wicked witches, grinning goblins, and hallucinating hags!’
    • ‘An old hag of a witch was approaching, her walk was staggered and she had enough warts on her nose so that you didn't know there was even a nose there.’
    • ‘The old hag turned my sister into a flea!’
    • ‘You know, there's those stereotypes of the evil old hag and this and that.’
    crone, old woman, witch, gorgon
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An ugly old woman.
      ‘a fat old hag in a dirty apron’
      • ‘They were friends, but also colleagues, and the last thing she wanted was to get all the old hags in the school talking.’
      • ‘And they look nothing like this now, the jaded old hags.’
      • ‘After all the old hags we met before, this one actually has teeth.’
      • ‘I had the vaguely presentable air crew, they had the old hags nearing retirement.’
      • ‘She had quickly adapted to the smoky atmosphere, but still was uncomfortable around the schizophrenic old woman; sometimes, she was the mad hag that she and Chrissey had met originally.’
      • ‘At first, I found it harder to ignore the pleas originating from young children, women, and old hags.’
      • ‘Maidens and old hags alike swooned in his presence.’
      • ‘I settled for Church and watched as these old hags praised Jesus like there was no tomorrow.’
      • ‘A few old hags, had even used it as a necklace to accessorize with.’
      • ‘Suddenly the doorman announces that an old crone, a hag palmist is at the door, demanding to tell the fortunes of the young and single women in the room.’
      crone, old woman, witch, gorgon
      View synonyms
  • 2

    short for hagfish
    • ‘As a first step toward an understanding of the molecular basis for the divergence of pigment patterns and speciation in cichlids, we cloned and characterized a cichlid homolog of the zebrafish hag gene.’

Origin

Middle English: perhaps from Old English hægtesse, hegtes, related to Dutch heks and German Hexe ‘witch’, of unknown ultimate origin.

Pronunciation

hag

/haɡ/

Main definitions of hag in English

: hag1hag2

hag2

noun

Scottish, Northern English
  • 1An overhang of peat.

    • ‘This broad mass of peat hags and bog pools rises to over 680-metres at the head of Littondale.’
    • ‘But so were the boulders and lumps of peat hag which pocked the scene.’
  • 2A soft place on a moor or a firm place in a bog.

Origin

Middle English (denoting a gap in a cliff): from Old Norse hǫgg ‘gap’, from hǫggva ‘hack, hew’.

Pronunciation

hag

/haɡ/