Definition of Gujarati in English:

Gujarati

(also Gujerati)

noun

  • 1A native or inhabitant of Gujarat.

    • ‘The south Asian diaspora in the United Kingdom comprises Indians (predominantly Gujaratis and Punjabis), Sri Lankans, Pakistanis, and Bangladeshis.’
    • ‘In the north, Bengalis, Kashmiris, Punjabis, Gujaratis, Rajputs, and Marathas are among the prominent groups.’
    • ‘Hundreds of Gujaratis streamed in to check out their roots.’
    • ‘The Punjabis and the Gujaratis dominate the Indian population, with about 40 to 45 percent coming from each of these two communities.’
    • ‘For this song the kids appeared on the stage dressed as Malayalis, Gujaratis and Punjabis.’
    • ‘Unlike Punjabis or Gujaratis, Malayalis could never settle down in a place away from their homeland.’
    • ‘Even in Gujarat, the Muslim Gujaratis did not retaliate.’
    • ‘The Gujaratis are a friendly, appreciative lot of people, hospitable but at the same time they practised simplicity and sobriety.’
    • ‘Some of the most populous Indian groups within the United States are Gujaratis, Bengalis, Punjabis, Marathis, and Tamils.’
    • ‘Despite the economic advances made by many Indians, including many Gujeratis, those of rural Gujerati origin have been, relatively speaking, left behind.’
    • ‘The emerging crop of Indian American filmmakers includes a number of Gujaratis, who instead of going in for medicine or engineering have embraced the ephemeral world of cinema instead.’
    • ‘Whites and people of African, Tamil, and mixed ancestry consider themselves the original inhabitants of the island, in contrast to Gujaratis and Chinese.’
    • ‘In general, Gujaratis conform to northern Indian patterns of kinship, marriage practices, and family structure.’
    • ‘Indian Sikhs, he said, made up the largest part of Southall's ethnic community, and East African Indian Gujaratis dominated Leicester.’
    • ‘Other Gujaratis who have taken shelter in Shorapur village complain of restlessness, getting upset easily and being irritable all the time.’
    • ‘She points out that the special dietary requirements of many Indians, especially Gujaratis, also showed the need for a special packaged tour geared to the community.’
    • ‘Unlike the majority of the pioneering Indian population in South Africa, most Gujaratis did not arrive in the country as indentured laborers.’
    • ‘In contrast to the situation in the United States, Gujaratis in Britain are still predominantly working class or petty bourgeois.’
    • ‘Even in the exceptional cases, the reason is vegetarianism as Jains, Brahmins and Gujaratis are very particular about this aspect.’
    • ‘It's certainly possible - there have been small groups of Gujaratis in Tamil Nadu for centuries.’
  • 2mass noun The Indic language of Gujarat, spoken by about 40 million people.

    • ‘It also has volunteers from the Asian community who speak different languages and has produced copies of its information leaflet in Punjabi, Gujarati, Chinese, Urdu, Bengali and Hindi.’
    • ‘He avers for the first time that his father, though speaking in Gujerati, used the English word ‘trust’ and proposed that he should draft and sign a trust document to formalise his intentions.’
    • ‘Entries can be sent in any language - Marathi, Gujarati, Hindi, Urdu and, of course, Hinglish.’
    • ‘Very recently, TV Channels have moved quickly from being just Hindi or English channels to covering other languages like Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali and Punjabi through their brands.’
    • ‘The charity has staff who can speak various languages including Punjabi, Hindi, Urdu, Bengali, Gujarati and Chinese.’
    • ‘You can also swear in Hindi, Urdu, Gujarati, and several other Indian languages.’
    • ‘I have sung in Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Urdu and English.’
    • ‘Three Indian languages were among the top 20 languages spoken at home - Hindi, Urdu and Gujarati.’
    • ‘Along with English, the following languages are spoken by branch staff: Hindi, Gujarati, Urdu and Punjabi.’
    • ‘The languages on offer include Malyalam, Gujarati, Hindi, Gurmukhi, Tamil and Bengali.’
    • ‘A versatile linguist, he has acted in every major regional language including Gujarati, Hindi, Marathi and Telegu.’
    • ‘Bhili, a language similar to Gujarati, is spoken by tribal groups in northern and eastern Gujarat.’
    • ‘Such is the case for many speakers of a minority language, like Gujarati in Britain, or French in provinces of Canada where francophones are in a minority.’
    • ‘He is currently studying for a PhD in microbiology, is a qualified further education teacher and speaks English, Urdu and Gujerati.’
    • ‘Women speaking Tamil, Gujerati, Hindi, walking in twos and threes, single file at the edge of the road, headed toward vegetables or saris, strewn out on white cloth-covered mats in tiny shops open to the street.’
    • ‘In addition to Bangla, Red Hat is working on localization of other Indian languages including Hindi, Gujarati, Punjabi and Tamil.’
    • ‘Shah, who serves with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, speaks not two or three but six languages - English, Hindi, Punjabi, Gujarati, Urdu and Pashto.’
    • ‘This segment of the festival had several local groups perform in four languages - English, Hindi, Marathi and Gujarati.’
    • ‘Living up to its name, the festival brings ‘quotes’ from real voices, who speak different languages - from Gujarati to Tamil.’
    • ‘Written in a clear and concise style, the leaflet has been into nine different languages including Arabic, Bengali, Gujerati, Hindi, Punjabi, Urdu, Somali, Vietnamese and Chinese, as well as English.’

adjective

  • Relating to Gujarat, its people, or its language.

    • ‘Amidst this unnerving display of journalistic cussedness, some Gujarati newspapers tried hard to sustain professional standards.’
    • ‘When the Indian state of Gujarat was hit by an earthquake in 2001, thousands of families among Britain's estimated 650,000 people of Gujarati descent were directly affected.’
    • ‘Whenever you go out, ask the travel desk officer in the hotel to write the destination in Gujarati language since it is easier for you to communicate with rickshaw drivers.’
    • ‘You are either a Gujarati or you know the Gujarati language or you had settled in some part of Gujarat not long ago.’
    • ‘Beautiful girls, good-looking guys, pretty women, natty kids and gregarious uncles - all clad in traditional Gujarati attire - are having a blast.’
    • ‘Given his Bharuch ancestry, he, one is sure, is reasonably well-versed in Gujarati language and is therefore in a position to read the leaflet in original.’
    • ‘In Belgium, in the northern city of Antwerp, hub of the world's diamond trade, in which so many Gujarati traders are active, a party called Vlams Blok has gained prominence.’
    • ‘Though traditionally they are Gujarati folk dance forms, their appeal has transcended regional barriers.’
    • ‘As a young girl this Gujarati actress aspired to become a pilot, but her destiny has taken her to the hustle and bustle of Bollywood.’
    • ‘‘We wanted to show people what real Gujarati cuisine is,’ he says.’
    • ‘In this fascinating book, she paints the backdrop of the Patel migration, so that you learn how Gujarati farmers landed from small villages to the corner shops of London.’
    • ‘The Guild team was shown a letter of congratulations sent by the Chief Minister to some Gujarati newspapers, for their coverage.’
    • ‘Chew, who was raised a Roman Catholic in Calcutta, doesn't claim to be an expert on Gujarati politics or society, but the reports she heard from the region were so disturbing that she felt she had to visit the area on her trip to India last year.’
    • ‘The fact that Gujarati Hindu communities are dominated by those who migrated to Britain from East Africa has also been an important factor in this process.’
    • ‘With the soothing sounds of the sitar in the background the troubles of the outside world melt away as you tuck in the huge range of authentic Gujarati dishes.’
    • ‘And those days were dotted with Gujarati cultural events, mostly ‘Thandia’, danced with concentration by seven Gujarati women in their twenties.’
    • ‘Some of the unique products include traditional Gujarati jewellery in white metal and silver, pure leather products, bedspreads from Gujarat and Rajasthan, and ornaments in semi-precious stones.’
    • ‘Congress sought to cover up its appeal to communal sentiment by modifying the Gujarati language version of its election manifesto.’
    • ‘It was formed in 1968 after the arrival of Gujarati Muslims from India to offer educational, spiritual and moral needs to children thought to be uncatered for by the mainstream system.’
    • ‘Were there expectations that they would marry Gujarati brides?’

Pronunciation

Gujarati

/ˌɡuːdʒəˈrɑːti//ˌɡʊdʒəˈrɑːti/