Main definitions of echo in English

: echo1Echo2

echo1

noun

  • 1A sound or sounds caused by the reflection of sound waves from a surface back to the listener.

    ‘the walls threw back the echoes of his footsteps’
    • ‘The high-pitched echoes sounded louder than the actual shriek itself as they rebounded off the dirt walls.’
    • ‘She listened to the tiny echoes of her footsteps.’
    • ‘The three of them slowly made their way into the next room, and the doors slammed behind them, raising a loud and booming echo.’
    • ‘Caleb had not yet caught up with her, but she heard the door open and then close behind her, followed by the echo of his footsteps off of the high walls.’
    • ‘He knelt, his knees cracking so loudly that a quiet echo bounced about the arena.’
    • ‘From past experience, I know that you can often hear a faint echo of your own voice.’
    • ‘There was no screaming, no running footsteps, no echoes across the stony surfaces.’
    • ‘These sounds are received as echoes in the dolphin's jawbone and the signal is transmitted to its brain.’
    • ‘But then came the loud echo of footsteps as a woman entered the arena.’
    • ‘If a bat sends out two clicks and notices a difference between the echoes, it knows a tasty bug is moving nearby.’
    • ‘Carpets are needed throughout to dull the sound of footsteps and echoes in the corridors, which can distract and upset some children.’
    • ‘In the distance, she could hear the faint echo of footsteps.’
    • ‘She remembered the dark, cold cavern and the hollow echoes of her footsteps as she walked into its darkness.’
    • ‘I stood still, listening, and realized it was not an echo but the sound of hooves - a lone rider coming through the gate.’
    • ‘The sewers reverberated with the muffled echoes of explosions and the sounds of war.’
    • ‘Blair stood frozen like that, listening to the echoes of his footsteps and the hum of his car engine reverberating in her ears as they faded into the night.’
    • ‘My hands went up to clap over my ears; each shot sounded like an explosion, the echoes rolling fast back through the woods.’
    • ‘She was about to give up when she heard the faint echo of voices somewhere nearby.’
    • ‘There's a distant, dim echo of his voice coming off the mountain, followed by silence.’
    • ‘We scream as we hit the water, the echoes flying back and forth in the circle of peaks.’
    reverberation, reverberating, reflection, resounding, ringing, repetition, repeat, reiteration, answer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A reflected radio or radar beam.
      • ‘Lakes of methane could cover three-quarters of Saturn's moon Titan, according to radio echoes from this cloud-shrouded world.’
      • ‘Analysis of the echoes produced will reveal much about the composition of the top five kilometres of the crust.’
      • ‘When a meteor streaks overhead, the system records a brief ping - the echo of a TV signal bouncing off the meteor's trail.’
      • ‘He says the radar echoes indicate that impact craters filled with liquid hydrocarbons may cover as much as 75 percent of Titan's surface.’
      • ‘For that reason, objects near the ground close to the radars often produce strong echoes even though they may not lie directly in the beam.’
      • ‘The echoes from the 32 beams are displayed on a high-resolution colour monitor.’
      • ‘It is true that, in bad weather, radar beams can be reflected off waves, causing false echoes or making the screen unreadable.’
      • ‘By sending out signals and retrieving the echoes, we can develop pictures of all the features on the ocean floor.’
      • ‘He did not invent a ‘death-ray’ weapon but he did find that his radio transmitters could create an echo from an plane that was over 200 miles away.’
      • ‘But with transatlantic fiber-optic cables, you have a direct connection with no echoes.’
      • ‘Coastal targets usually produced very distinctive echoes on the radar.’
      • ‘Scientists will use intensity of the echoes to speculate about the nature of the surface.’
      • ‘Analysis of radar echoes showed birds crossed the Great Lakes in large numbers, although we also found evidence of birds avoiding lake crossing in some locations.’
    2. 1.2mass noun The deliberate introduction of reverberation into a sound recording.
      • ‘Dub is minimalized [and] spacey with the reverb and echo.’
      • ‘One of the first sounds on the album is the toot from a melodica drenched in echo; now you know why I bothered with the introduction.’
      • ‘The sound mix adds more reverberant echo to Vaughan's voice once the entirety of the space and the physical relations within it have been revealed.’
      • ‘The sound mix is monaural, with some echo in spots to give it the illusion of depth, especially during internal monologues.’
      • ‘And then there's that voice: a lazy, amniotic drift like some ageless, graceful neuter, swathed in a nimbus of echo and reverb.’
      • ‘The problem, as I see it anyway, is that… well, I'm normally just super keen on albums making liberal use of reverb, echo, or delay.’
      • ‘Think lots of reverb, echo, and all-out intergalactic noise accompanying traditional reggae beats and vocals.’
      • ‘True, the band is actually vocalizing live, complete with lots of reverb and echo to mimic their records' spatial luxury.’
      • ‘The recorded sound has too much echo for my taste, but I can live with it.’
      • ‘Dub music prefigured the dance remix, with fewer vocals and layers of bass-heavy echo and reverb, giving the MC more room to chat over records.’
      • ‘Unfurling in a narcotic haze, the five songs on Auspicious Winds unfold slowly upon flowing echo and chiming reverb.’
    3. 1.3Linguistics The repetition in structure and content of one speaker's utterance by another.
      • ‘Of course, echoes and repetitions do not necessarily imply non-differentiation of subjectivity.’
  • 2A close parallel to an idea, feeling, or event.

    ‘his love for her found an echo in her own feelings’
    • ‘However, for those seeking echoes of today's events, there are some hints there.’
    • ‘I can remember echoes of that Presbyterian morality in Scotland as late as the 1980's and think they probably exist still today in very diluted form.’
    • ‘The latter term evokes a distant echo to disgust, a moral revulsion that verges on physical recoil.’
    • ‘It is common for listeners to perceive an echo of Beethoven's life in his music, which often depicts struggle followed by triumph.’
    • ‘And in an echo of events in Britain, 75,000 civil servants will be made redundant over the next two years.’
    • ‘The news from Washington this past week had eerie echoes of the lead-up to the war in Iraq.’
    • ‘Yesterday's attacks carried several eerie echoes of the July 7 bombings.’
    • ‘This meant that fewer echoes or remnants of the market had survived.’
    • ‘In a vague echo of '60s counterculture and New Age platitudes, these crusades are likened to the sacred quest for human freedom.’
    • ‘He suggests that the Bali bombings are an echo of this.’
    • ‘Moreover one frequently finds echoes of his ideas in the writing of many specialists.’
    • ‘There are certainly echoes of other recent events.’
    • ‘In Spain and Greece early 2002 gave the lie to the persistent rumours that the movement could not survive the echoes of 11 September in the most dramatic way.’
    • ‘This was seen at the time as a morale-boosting exercise designed to show contempt for the enemy and was an echo of a similar mess meeting held in Occupied France during the second world war.’
    • ‘Definitely there's echoes of perhaps this idea of going out in a blaze of glory, or perhaps as a stark reminder to people of the reality of motor vehicle crashes.’
    • ‘But there are ominous echoes of the past.’
    duplicate, copy, replica, facsimile, reproduction, imitation, close likeness, exact likeness, mirror image, twin, double, clone, match, mate, fellow, counterpart, parallel
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    1. 2.1 A characteristic that is suggestive of something else.
      ‘the cheese has a sharp rich aftertaste with echoes of salty, earthy pastures’
      • ‘There are echoes of those ‘protect and survive leaflets’ issued ‘in the event of nuclear disaster’ in the 70s.’
      • ‘The tone of children's stories merges with echoes of the Authorised Version.’
      • ‘Carrying echoes of a similar bond in Heavenly Creatures, the film has a hypnotic quality as the lazy days of a long, hot summer provide the backdrop to the girls' fleeting friendship.’
      • ‘You can see echoes of Edinburgh step-gabling in the windows, hints of Scots baronial in the reception area and Celtic crosses carved into the ceiling.’
      • ‘Yet their attitude to the poor, if condescending, was generous, and echoes of Young England survived as elements in Disraeli's later vision of Tory democracy.’
      trace, vestige, remains, remnant, relic, survival, ghost, memory, evocation, recollection, remembrance, reminiscence, reminder, souvenir, sign, mark, indication, token, suggestion, hint, evidence, clue, allusion, intimation
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  • 3archaic A person who slavishly repeats the words or opinions of another.

    ‘Clarendon, whom they reckoned the faithful echo of their master's intentions’
  • 4Bridge
    A play by a defender of a higher card in a suit followed by a lower one in a subsequent trick, used as a signal to request a further lead of that suit by their partner.

  • 5A code word representing the letter E, used in radio communication.

  • 6Used in names of newspapers.

    ‘the South Wales Echo’
    • ‘A liner disaster and a football team are the two strongest images of Southampton in the minds of outsiders, according to an Echo survey.’

verb

  • 1no object, with adverbial (of a sound) be repeated or reverberate after the original sound has stopped.

    ‘their footsteps echoed on the metal catwalks’
    • ‘Save for their footsteps, which echoed in the darkness, it was deathly silent.’
    • ‘Thunder echoed through the house and shook it as it bellowed across the sky.’
    • ‘The noise of it shutting echoed eerily through the seemingly empty hallway.’
    • ‘So far, only four numbers had been retrieved and the sound of feet echoed even louder now.’
    • ‘The sound echoed down the halls, and they all jumped.’
    • ‘Kevin's voice echoes slightly off the walls.’
    • ‘The sounds of fierce combat echo throughout the Combat Arena.’
    • ‘Her voice echoed loudly off the metal walls.’
    • ‘Their attention was drawn to the sounds echoing down the corridor from the hall ahead of them.’
    • ‘At that moment, a long wolf howl was heard, echoing through the woods.’
    • ‘Her footsteps echoed softly against the linoleum floor.’
    • ‘She could hear the reverberation of the boom echo throughout the house.’
    • ‘Footsteps echoed hollowly in the corridor outside her cell, coming closer.’
    • ‘The next thing I know a loud ringing echoes in my ears.’
    • ‘He slowly brought up his head as a cheering roar echoed throughout the grand chamber.’
    • ‘Thunder echoed again through the corridors of castle Novena.’
    • ‘My bags of groceries rustle, and the sound echoes loudly in the large room.’
    • ‘Suddenly, a shrill cry echoed through the forest.’
    • ‘Gunshots echoed through the forests, quickly absorbed by the trees surrounding the cottage.’
    • ‘Her footsteps echoed loudly down the long halls.’
    1. 1.1 (of a place) resound with or reflect back a sound.
      ‘the house echoed with shouts’
      ‘an echoing corridor’
      • ‘The twisty streets of Monaco echoed with the scream of F1 engines today as the 2005 grand prix weekend got under way.’
      • ‘As he completed his speech, the room echoed with applause and cheers of celebration.’
      • ‘The quiet environs of the city once echoed with their timeless chimings.’
      • ‘The area curiously echoed with each solemn step he made even though there were no walls to bounce the sound about.’
      • ‘Suddenly, the mood lightened and the room echoed with laughter.’
      • ‘As I write, the skies are echoing not with the beating of angelic wings but with the rotating blades of surveillance helicopters circling noisily overhead.’
      • ‘But while most bars echoed with the sound of despair, jubilant cheers could be heard coming from one Old Town pub.’
      • ‘The coals in the hearth glowed a dull red in prospect and the space echoed with unearthly silence.’
      • ‘Our most haunted streets echo nightly to the sound of many ghost tours.’
      • ‘In the darkness, the streets of Los Angeles echoed with the sound of marching feet.’
      • ‘The entire place echoes constantly with the screams of prisoners.’
      • ‘The whole room echoed with laughter as she stared at me.’
      • ‘On 12 June, a Swiss journalist in Paris came upon a herd of abandoned cows in central Paris whose streets, empty of cars, echoed with the sound of their bellowing.’
      • ‘The room echoed with the murmurs that followed the last comment.’
      • ‘Antique carpets covered the floor and the big space echoed with every step you took.’
      • ‘She slammed the door, hot tears streamed down her cheeks as the hotel room echoed with the sound of her unsteady breathing.’
      • ‘The room echoed with sounds of yelling, crashing, and glasses shattering.’
      • ‘Yes, the back streets of Venice echoed with the sounds of The Cornetto Song as we entered the heart of Venice.’
      reverberate, re-echo, resonate, resound, reflect, ring, pulsate, vibrate, be repeated
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    2. 1.2with object Repeat (someone's words or opinions), typically to express agreement.
      ‘these criticisms are echoed in a number of other studies’
      with direct speech ‘‘A trip?’ she echoed’
      • ‘On Tuesday some other disappointed chairman will echo his words.’
      • ‘As someone who has watched and reported on the story since it broke, I must echo his opinion; the regulations are a farce.’
      • ‘The negative ones echo my own opinion that the book really isn't very good.’
      • ‘His views were echoed by a resident of Island Close, who is equally frustrated.’
      • ‘His words were echoed by those who spoke after him of the need for social dialogue and joint problem solving, pooling of all available resources for the common good.’
      • ‘The Palestinian Prime Minister's reaction in a press conference echoed this rhetoric.’
      • ‘Which is what we have; and nothing, I might add, echoing his words, is better calculated to undermine ministers' responsibility.’
      • ‘How many can echo his words ‘It's a joy getting up each morning for work’?’
      • ‘Youth elsewhere in the country also echo these sentiments.’
      • ‘These words were echoed by one commuter on the 65 bus route, which passes the advert, who asked not to be named.’
      • ‘His comments echo the findings of reports into race relations in Bradford published following last summer's riots.’
      • ‘Candidates from all parties are echoing similar rhetoric.’
      • ‘In the meantime, he simply echoes the words of Keynes who once said that ‘in the long run we are all dead’.’
      • ‘This opinion was echoed by a few other visitors, who also felt that the prices were competitive.’
      • ‘It was a view echoed in Britain not so long ago by those who spoke of the ‘cycle of deprivation’ which afflicted the poor and the working class.’
      • ‘Bishop Chartres's words were echoed during a series of commemoration services held at cathedrals and churches around the country over the weekend.’
      • ‘The voters will likely remain satisfied to hear their views echoed rather than to have a representative on the government side.’
      • ‘The world echoes with condemnation of the suicide bombers.’
      • ‘Solemnly the council once again echoed what the spokesman said.’
      repeat, say again, restate, reiterate, copy, imitate, parrot, parody, mimic
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  • 2with object (of an object or event) be reminiscent of or have shared characteristics with.

    ‘a blue suit that echoed the colour of her eyes’
    • ‘Both police chiefs and Make Poverty History organisers will be hoping both protests echo the spirit of Saturday's rally which saw just two arrests.’
    • ‘The disparate ‘production value’ of the performances echoes each side's methods.’
    • ‘Later events echoed an elegiac note first struck in 1892.’
    • ‘They echo the spectacular colours of the trees - one week short of their prime - but nevertheless of an intensity unseen in Britain.’
    • ‘When Monica is re-born by a male scientist figure in this future society, an event that echoes the immaculate conception birth of David, she is the woman-as-mother.’
    • ‘But I will add that it often happens that after I publish a novel or story, some event in the news echoes it.’
    • ‘Its downfall echoed much of the telecom sector in that it was caught in the pincer grip of a fall in business activity and too much debt, courtesy of its acquisition binge.’
    • ‘The intruders' violent ends echo the combativeness with which Trebor dealt with the world around him.’
    • ‘That phantom limb pain often echoes the injury that led to the amputation.’
    • ‘If a historical parallel is necessary the successes of the coalition echo some of the strengths of the civil rights movement in the US in the 1960s.’
    • ‘I predict the series finale will echo Seinfeld's last episode, in which the show's creators finally forced us to see Seinfeld and his gang as petty and brutish and not funny at all.’
    • ‘Its gameplay echoes the familiar Raiden series, but with much more variety than simply red and blue ships.’
    • ‘The songs are precisely chosen to echo the events onscreen, but they fit organically with the scenes.’
    • ‘The ample embroidery is influenced by Romanian blouses, again echoing the feminine qualities of woven art.’
    • ‘The contingencies of the voyage-in-progress had to be made to echo the events of the original voyage, or they would receive no airtime.’
    • ‘The glint on the wire frames of his spectacles echoes the glint on the birdcage wire.’
  • 3Computing
    with object Send a copy of (an input signal or character) back to its source or to a screen for display.

    ‘for security reasons, the password will not be echoed to the screen’
    • ‘Dynamic pages that are vulnerable to this hack include search results, error messages and Web-form results pages that echo data entered by the user.’
    • ‘If the server were to echo the download requests, the target machine would enter an endless loop which could tie up its resources and from which the only escape is a re-boot.’
    • ‘Every time you pass the print statement, it is echoed to the screen, interspaced with the debugging materials.’
    • ‘But when I try to execute the network script, the system sticks after echoing the following.’
    • ‘Immediately upon receiving the TRACE command, any Web server will simply echo back what is sent to it.’
  • 4Bridge
    no object (of a defender) play a higher card followed by a lower one in the same suit, as a signal to request one's partner to lead that suit.

Phrases

  • applaud (or cheer) someone to the echo

    • Applaud (or cheer) someone enthusiastically.

      ‘they recognized that this was a new star, and applauded him to the echo’
      • ‘Jetting out of trap four he was in control at the opening bend and his followers cheered him to the echo all the way home.’
      • ‘Two miles out his Grace was met by a large and representative body of the parishioners who, when his Grace drove up cheered him to the echo, and afterwards formed in processional order behind his carriage bearing many religious emblems.’
      • ‘But Yarmouth saluted him with cannon and cheered him to the echo.’
      • ‘The people who jostled and barracked him at the count centre were the same people who cheered him to the echo seven years ago.’
      • ‘She is delighted that Liz has come out of retirement for a final fling at an arena close enough to ensure a sizeable contingent of home fans will cheer her to the echo.’
      • ‘Many times in later years Naomh Eoin were cheered to the echo from the Deerpark end of the ‘old stand’.’
      • ‘But at full-time the same player positively skipped to the dressing room, saluting the supporters cheering him to the echo.’
      applaud, clap one's hands, give someone a round of applause, put one's hands together
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French or Latin, from Greek ēkhō, related to ēkhē ‘a sound’.

Pronunciation

echo

/ˈɛkəʊ/

Main definitions of echo in English

: echo1Echo2

Echo2

proper noun

Greek Mythology
  • A nymph deprived of speech by Hera in order to stop her chatter, and left able only to repeat what others had said.

Pronunciation

Echo

/ˈɛkəʊ/