Definition of Cupid in English:

Cupid

proper noun

Roman Mythology
  • 1The god of love. He is represented as a naked winged boy with a bow and arrows, with which he wounds his victims.

    Greek equivalent eros
    1. 1.1A representation of a naked winged child, typically carrying a bow.
      ‘little cupids floated in roseate clouds’
      • ‘It's a bit rich that you're the one to play cupid when your own love life seems to be non-existent.’
      • ‘He led her to a painting of a naked cupid and Venus.’
      • ‘A guest at a ball, in conversation, repeats the pointing gesture of the cupid in the painting behind her.’
      • ‘Behind the couples, a cupid brings new arrivals, while under the trees at right, other couples sing to the accompaniment of a recorder or oboe.’
      • ‘I like you together and I think of my self as cupid since I did put you two together.’

Phrases

  • play cupid

    • Try to initiate a romantic relationship between two people.

      ‘are you sure you want to play Cupid with these two?’
      • ‘Another of her tasks is to play Cupid during the mating season.’
      • ‘They would never admit to anyone that they had played Cupid, but they were satisfied knowing that the two were good together.’
      • ‘He knew when Mary found out she might be furious but like he said it was time someone played cupid.’
      • ‘They try to play cupid to bring their friends together, and in the process, they fall in love.’
      • ‘Are you sure you want to be playing Cupid with those two?’
      • ‘It's a bit rich that you're the one to play cupid when your own love life seems to be non-existent.’

Origin

From Latin Cupido, personification of cupido love, desire, from cupere to desire.

Pronunciation:

Cupid

/ˈkjuːpɪd/