Definition of Cotswold in English:

Cotswold

noun

  • 1A sheep of a breed with fine wool, often used to produce cross-bred lambs.

  • 2[mass noun] Double Gloucester cheese containing chives and onions.

adjective

  • Relating to the Cotswolds.

    • ‘As she got out of her car in the mid-afternoon Cotswold sun she was greeted by her hostess.’
    • ‘It is an impossibly picturesque Cotswold market town.’
    • ‘Stories submitted by Cotswold people will be stored electronically and displayed for posterity on the BBC's website.’
    • ‘Personally, I am rather partial to the Cotswold variant.’
    • ‘The additional height has been achieved through the building of a new 10,000 gallon reservoir on the top of the Cotswold escarpment.’
    • ‘In some respects East Hampton reminds me of certain Cotswold villages - an idealised version of small town life that only ever existed in Rupert Brooke poems or, in this case, Disney movies.’
    • ‘Unlike the old wooden one, the new pavilion is made of Cotswold stone and is very large, with a 200 sq m floor area.’
    • ‘Soaring prices on the world aluminium market have been blamed for a spate of sign thefts which are endangering Cotswold motorists.’
    • ‘Their most serious setback came when valuable Cotswold stone roof tiles from the roof were stolen by thieves.’
    • ‘An aristocrat has slammed a proposed building in a beautiful award-winning Cotswold village saying it is ‘more suited to a Swindon housing estate.’’
    • ‘His autobiographical account of himself as a small boy growing up in an even smaller Cotswold village in a secluded valley, holds a special place in the hearts of its millions of readers.’
    • ‘Youngsters from Winchcombe School are preparing to pay their respects to Cotswold soldiers.’
    • ‘Last year the centre celebrated the life of another eminent Cotswold man.’
    • ‘A similar exercise in Bourton last year proved a success and highlighted the need for further efforts in other North Cotswold towns.’
    • ‘Echo the material your house is made of in the terracing: brick, perhaps, or Cotswold stone.’
    • ‘Police are urging Cotswold families not to put presents under the tree this Christmas.’
    • ‘It's a Cotswold village that's very much a working village.’
    • ‘She also paid tribute to the hard work of local volunteers who ensure that the ancient Cotswold tradition continues year after year.’
    • ‘The couple are hoping to take up residence in a seven-bedroom rambling Cotswold house by Christmas.’
    • ‘The High Street contains many Cotswold stone buildings constructed between the 14th and 17th centuries and is now designated as a conservation area.’

Pronunciation:

Cotswold

/ˈkɒtswəʊld/