Definition of Barbour in English:


(also Barbour jacket)


  • A type of green waxed outdoor jacket.

    • ‘Behind me, 20 yards to my right, is Raymond - with his baseball cap tilted back on his head, looking rather less the part than me in my borrowed Barbour deerstalker.’
    • ‘During filming I found Jenny more difficult to watch than John because I could see myself in her and watch her look across the lawn, with the same sort of haircut and wearing a Barbour and jeans.’
    • ‘Rating: 5/10 Items can be costly, but a Barbour jacket is designed to last a lifetime - send it back and they'll even re-wax it.’
    • ‘The description of a man in a green Barbour style jacket with dark collar length hair has cropped up a number of times in the investigation into the murder.’
    • ‘The reason is, if a place is this good, it will have been discovered long ago - first by locals, and then by annoying City types who like to sport wellies and Barbours at the weekend.’
    • ‘Don't expect too many Barbours and smelly dogs in Scotland on Sunday's new society journal, The Social.’
    • ‘I feel rather protective of him and when I see all those men and boys with guns and matching Barbours I want to keep him as a pet.’
    • ‘Piers Eyre, 64, wearing a Barbour jacket and carrying an expensive walking cane, cut an unlikely figure as he mixed with veteran peace protesters.’
    • ‘Many more important issues will be sending the protesters to London with their Barbours and picnic hampers.’
    • ‘He wears a knee-length Barbour and carries a cute little wicker basket.’
    • ‘Hence the same sheepskin jackets, wool coats and Barbours turn up year after year.’
    • ‘Civilians can get stuff changed on their Barbours, too - so if you want an extra pocket for the Labrador chews, now's your chance.’
    • ‘He would have liked his normal holster but with his battered Barbour jacket and pullover it would have been impractical and conspicuous.’
    • ‘Seemed a shame to muss it up for a ten minute trip, so I pulled out the Barbour, gave it a shake, and off I went, secure inside my shabby old coat and under my padded fisherman's cap.’
    • ‘One analyst who met him for the first time on Wednesday said: ‘You can't help but think that he would look more at home wearing a Barbour jacket than a Savile Row suit.’
    • ‘Yeah, right, like any of us are going to stand shoulder to shoulder with someone wearing a Barbour and a tweed cap.’
    • ‘A traditional Barbour jacket will not only keep out the rain but will also more than pass muster throughout the season.’
    • ‘I'm not inclined to argue because the Barbour is just about worn through in some places and has become distinctly dowdy.’
    • ‘It being a particularly cold morning, I grabbed my Barbour as I left for work, jammed my phone into the pocket and felt a piece of paper.’
    • ‘It's a fascinating place - I wandered past a group of people doing the Jack the Ripper guided walk, led by a flamboyant guy in a long Barbour cape.’


Named after John Barbour (died 1918), a draper in NE England who sold waterproof clothing.