Definition of Aymara in English:



  • 1A member of an American Indian people inhabiting the high plateau region of Bolivia and Peru near Lake Titicaca.

    • ‘Well, he must have had a straw boat like the Aymaras use in Lake Titticacca.’
    • ‘For more than 500 years we, the Quechuas, Aymaras and Guaranis, the Indians who are native to this noble land, have been subject to slavery.’
    • ‘Many Aymaras reside in cities and live in modern houses or apartments.’
    • ‘Our church is in a companion relationship with the Bolivian Evangelical Lutheran Church, most of whose 20,000 members are Aymara.’
    • ‘The concern in Bolivia is that if the state is left to its own devices, with a strong but fragmented opposition movement, it will use its collective strength to smash movements such as that of the Aymara.’
  • 2[mass noun] The language of the Aymara, with over 2 million speakers. It may be related to Quechua.

    • ‘Native American communities still maintain their indigenous languages such as Quechua, Aymara, and the lesser known Indian languages spoken by the Amazon groups.’
    • ‘More than 50 percent are Amerindians who speak mainly Quechua or Aymara as well as Spanish.’
    • ‘Furthermore, the local radio stations often broadcast programs in local languages, e.g. Quechua and Aymara, in addition to programs in the national language, i.e. Spanish.’
    • ‘Several varieties of Spanish, Quechua, and Aymara are spoken, and all have influenced one another in vocabulary, phonology, syntax, and grammar.’
    • ‘Lots of them don't speak Spanish, and I don't know Quechua or Aymara.’


  • Relating to the Aymara or their language.

    • ‘Another Aymara festival is Alacitas, the Festival of Abundance, which takes place in La Paz and the Lake Titicaca region.’
    • ‘Here I will attempt to ‘translate’ what I've learned over these years - mainly through my relationship with the indigenous Aymara people.’
    • ‘These wider networks of solidarity, based on family ties, place of origin and ethnicity, have allowed the formation of an urban-rural Aymara identity, capable of a strong political projection.’
    • ‘An Aymara woman admires the artistry of the poncho I am wearing with a gold-toothed grin.’
    • ‘The vanguard sector in this struggle is the well-organized Aymara peasants, who have descended en masse from the altiplano, above the capital.’


Bolivian Spanish.