Definition of (much) of a muchness in English:

(much) of a muchness

phrase

informal
  • Very similar.

    ‘the polls looked much of a muchness but concealed politically crucial variations’
    • ‘The contestants for Miss World are a bit of a muchness but Miss Moldova, Elena Daniliciuc, wins in the Triumphant Hat category.’
    • ‘Well, up to a point, all are much of a muchness as they all use the same components.’
    • ‘Despite calls from my family to have a satellite subscription, I decided to say no as from what my friends tell me, its all much of a muchness.’
    • ‘I'm afraid I am finding it increasingly hard to distinguish between a good comedy and a bad sitcom anymore - it's all pretty much a much of a muchness.’
    • ‘In general though, children are much of a muchness.’
    • ‘In general, most of what I pick up seems to be much of a muchness, and I usually find myself reading for the sake of getting through the book, rather than because I actually give a damn.’
    • ‘For many people, the choice between a Beazley-led Opposition is much of a muchness to that of a Crean-led Opposition.’
    • ‘Fashion statements and identity statements are much of a muchness as far as I'm concerned.’
    • ‘Can't remember now what brand it was but they were all much of a muchness.’
    • ‘In a nutshell, the fragmentation of the simple traditional society allowed the rise of autonomous individuals who were seen as being, at least in the abstract, much of a muchness.’
    • ‘To be honest, Minneapolis sushi is much of a muchness.’
    • ‘You can start to think all singer-songwriters (with requisite part-time backing band) are much of a muchness, until you see a real talent like Liam Frost.’
    • ‘Coun Peter Roberts said: ‘I'm happy that a document has come forward but it still seems much of a muchness and there's nothing different.’’
    • ‘It's tempting to think that most modern cars are much of a muchness when it comes to interior refinement these days but it's certainly not the case.’
    • ‘That's nothing against this particular establishment but more the fact that many so-called Italian restaurants - especially chain restaurants - are, to put it bluntly, much of a muchness.’
    • ‘I trained with Paolo Di Canio every week at West Ham and after that everything is much of a muchness.’
    • ‘It's hardly surprising when the stories are all really much of a muchness, eagerly evoking some humanist vision of the universal spirit.’
    • ‘Music's much of a muchness with me, but I do have two daughters who do their best to keep me up to date with what's going on.’
    • ‘We don't vote because we feel we have no control, or there is nobody to vote for, or they are all much of a muchness, but at the same time we stand by our Great Land and wave our flag with pride.’
    • ‘Although there are minor differences in the style of wrought curlicue, or the gauge of the steel, they are all much of a muchness.’